Private Jets & Brexit

While political uncertainty over Brexit continues, life must go on as normal for British families – and that includes making flight plans. The UK is due to leave the EU at the end of January 2020, right in the peak of the Ski season.

We still don’t know for sure how Britain will leave the EU – with a deal, or without. If the UK leaves with Boris Johnsons deal, then there will be a transition period until at least the end of 2020, in which little will actually change. If not, then there will be even more questions about what’s happening after 31st January. Here’s what we currently know about how holidays abroad might be affected by Brexit.

Can I book a flight in the EU?

You might be wondering if it is safe to book at all, given the dire warnings from some about what could happen in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

The Association of British Travel Agents (Abta), which offers advice to travellers and represents travel agents and tour operators, advises: “There is nothing to suggest that you will not be able to continue with your holiday plans after 31st January 2020. Even in a no-deal scenario, the European Commission has said flights to and from the UK will still be able to operate.”

And as for travelling by plane, the government has said that “flights should continue” as they do today, if there is no deal, adding: “Both the UK and EU want flights to continue without any disruption.”
Helicopters, Air Taxis, Business Jets, Corporate Jets and VIP Airliners, we have a fleet to suit every situation.

Will i need a visa ?

The main question most people want to know is whether or not they will need a visa to get to Europe.

You can breathe a sigh of relief – to some extent – as the European Commission has said UK holidaymakers won’t need a visa even if there’s no deal, Abta said.
However, British people will need to apply for – and buy – a visa waiver to travel to member states after Brexit whether there’s a deal or not.

The ETIAS (European Travel Information and Authorisation System), which will cost €7 (£6.30) and be valid for three years, won’t come into force until at least 2021 though. It’s not just for the UK but many non-EU countries.

In a no deal situation, the European Commission has proposed that you wouldn’t need a visa for short stays in the EU. Visitors would be able to stay for up to 90 days out of any 180-day period, the government has said. You might need a visa before travel if you intend to stay in the Schengen area for more than 90 days though out of that 180-day period.

These rules would come into effect from 1st Ferbuary March 2020. If there is a Brexit deal, EU citizens and UK nationals will continue to be able to travel freely with a passport or identity card until the end of the transition period expected to end early 2021
.
When that ends, the European Commission has offered visa-free travel for UK nationals coming to the EU for a short stay, as long as the UK offers the same in return.
But nothing changes in terms of travel to and from the Republic of Ireland. British and Irish citizens will be able to continue to travel freely within the Common Travel Area – the UK, Ireland, the Isle of Man, Guernsey and Jersey, the government says.

Do i need a new passport ?

No deal? If the UK leaves without a deal, then new rules will apply. You’ll have to check if your current passport meets those rules and renew it if not.

Basically, British passport holders will be considered third country nationals as part of the Schengen agreement. Other third country nationals are those from places that aren’t in the EU or European Economic Area, like the US and Australia.
So according to the Schengen Border Code, passports from these countries have to have been issued within the previous 10 years and be valid for another three months from the date you plan to depart the Schengen area, which makes up 26 European states.

But because you’re allowed to stay in the Schengen area for up to 90 days, the government is advising you make sure your passport is valid for at least another six months after your arrival.

However, it is also possible that some people with up to 15 months left on their passports could be prevented from travel, the government said.

Between 2001 and 2018, adults who renewed their UK passports before their old one had expired were allowed to have the time left on the old passport added to the new passport, up to a maximum of nine months.

This means some people’s current passports may have initially been valid for 10 years and nine months. But, those additional nine months will not be valid for travel to Schengen countries in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

Abta advises people check their passports now to see how long they’re valid for.
If there’s a deal, your passport will be valid until its date of expiry for anywhere within the EU.

Driving in Europe

f there’s no deal, your licence might not be valid by itself when driving in the EU. It means you might need to get hold of an International Driving Permit (IDP) as well, which costs £5.50.

You might also need one of those to hire a vehicle. You will need to carry your UK driving licence as well.

Spain, Malta and Cyprus require a different type of IDP – the one governed by the 1949 Geneva Convention on Road Traffic – which lasts 12 months. All other EU countries, as well as Norway and Switzerland, recognise the 1968 convention IDP, which is valid for three years.

For those British nationals living in the EU, it’s a bit more complex.
They’ve been urged to swap their licence for a local one as soon as possible in case there’s no deal. If they don’t do that, they might have to pass a new test in the country where they’re living if there’s no deal.

Further questions

Whilst we do not know the answer if we are leaving with a deal or not the team here at Admiral Jet are constantly updated with the latest changes and how it may impact you. Please do not hesitate to CONTACT US should you have any questions regarding Brexit & Private Jet travel.

FAQ:

Can I book a flight in the EU? (Brexit)

You might be wondering if it is safe to book at all, given the dire warnings from some about what could happen in the event of a no-deal Brexit. The Association of British Travel Agents (Abta), which offers advice to travellers and represents travel agents and tour operators, advises: “There is nothing to suggest that you will not be able to continue with your holiday plans after 31st January 2020. Even in a no-deal scenario, the European Commission has said flights to and from the UK will still be able to operate.” And as for travelling by plane, the government has said that “flights should continue” as they do today, if there is no deal, adding: “Both the UK and EU want flights to continue without any disruption.” Helicopters, Air Taxis, Business Jets, Corporate Jets and VIP Airliners, we have a fleet to suit every situation.

Will i need a visa? (Brexit)

The main question most people want to know is whether or not they will need a visa to get to Europe. You can breathe a sigh of relief – to some extent – as the European Commission has said UK holidaymakers won’t need a visa even if there’s no deal, Abta said. However, British people will need to apply for – and buy – a visa waiver to travel to member states after Brexit whether there’s a deal or not. The ETIAS (European Travel Information and Authorisation System), which will cost €7 (£6.30) and be valid for three years, won’t come into force until at least 2021 though. It’s not just for the UK but many non-EU countries.

Do i need a new passport ? (Brexit)

No deal? If the UK leaves without a deal, then new rules will apply. You’ll have to check if your current passport meets those rules and renew it if not. Basically, British passport holders will be considered third country nationals as part of the Schengen agreement. Other third country nationals are those from places that aren’t in the EU or European Economic Area, like the US and Australia. So according to the Schengen Border Code, passports from these countries have to have been issued within the previous 10 years and be valid for another three months from the date you plan to depart the Schengen area, which makes up 26 European states. But because you’re allowed to stay in the Schengen area for up to 90 days, the government is advising you make sure your passport is valid for at least another six months after your arrival.